Episode 161 :: The Zapruder Film








Show Notes

Shot on November 22, 1963, the Zapruder film was one of the most significant pictures ever taken. As we near the 50th Anniversary of the JFK Assassination I thought this would be an interesting topic to look at. I think you could argue that this was one of the earliest examples of citizen journalism – a good 40 years before social media. Today we’ve come to expect first hand footage of events like this, but in 1963 this was the perfect example of the right person in the right place at the right moment. Think how history would be viewed if it weren’t for this film. This is how we remember the assassination and this is the source of all the controversy that extends from it.

On November 22, Abraham Zapruder, an amateur film maker and supporter of John F Kennedy, took his 414 Bell & Howell Zoomatic to Dealey Plaza in Dallas, Texas. He rolled 26.6 seconds of film – only 486 frames that captured a first hand look of the murder of the 35th president of the United States.

Links:

Wikipedia Entry on the Zapruder film
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zapruder_film

Compilation of existing footage of the JFK motorcade from Love Field to Parkland Hospital
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WnlL-pucCj0

The Zapruder Film

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2 thoughts on “Episode 161 :: The Zapruder Film

  1. I saw Parkland several weeks ago and agree completely that it was amazing. A bit of a different spin on a story you thought you knew so well. No CG, no major pyrotechnics, just a story, well told and well acted. Thank goodness for the “indie” film or art film or whatever you wish to call it. The low budget nature of these films force the filmmaker to do his job, not being able to hide behind all the techno-crud. I hope they never stop making films like this.